Archives for posts with tag: gaming

A preview of RAGE, a first person shooter set in a post-apocalyptic world, finds its way on to our Gaming Video of the Day. RAGE looks like a fantastic game that really reminds me of Borderlands. The game features some devastating looking weapons, as well as some incredibly intelligent AI. I will let the video do the rest of the talking as I hit the replay button on my screen. This is sure to be a hit for gamers everywhere. It will release on September 13, 2011 for Xbox 360, Playstation 3, and PC. Enjoy and be sure to come back for tomorrow’s Gaming Video of the Day!

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The very first Gaming Video of the Day is an absolute classic and probably my favorite Halo video of all time. This Walshy montage (edited by Peridious) was the montage to end all montages back in the day. It has some fantastic music put to it, and the effects were top notch when released. From the mind blowing beginning to the final kill, Halo fans everywhere sat with their jaws dropped as they patiently watched Walshy (of then team Final Boss) take down enemy after enemy. He’s the current Tiger Woods of Halo – he’s had a remarkable career that landed him at the top and was absolutely dominant for a stretch of time. Everybody expected him to win every event he attended. But then he hit a rough patch and started to sink. Everybody knows he could win another event at any time, but just as Tiger Woods fan ask, Walshy fans also ask when that event will be. Continue reading about the video here.

Are you a fan of the Halo series? Are you curious as to what people think about the newest addition? Are you frustrated with Halo Reach and can’t figure out why, or wondering if anybody else is as flustered as you? Are you bored and want to read a well thought out post about a game that sold millions of copies on the Xbox 360? I can tell you that I considered Halo Reach to be a disappointment and it’s not because I had high expectations. If you answered yes to any of the opening questions, or even if you didn’t but you would still like to know why I wasn’t entirely satisfied with the highly anticipated installment, go ahead and read my entire post here.

Ever wanted to create a game? Ever wanted to be involved in a team that makes games? It seems like fun, doesn’t it?

In my first year at college, I noticed many people in Computer Science (CS) with a lackadaisical understanding that their CS degree would be their window into making video games. From a teenager just coming out of high-school, a career doing what you sit around playing all day anyway seems like a dream job. So students go into the CS program with an understanding that they will come out suddenly aware of how to make games. But this is far from the truth – most CS programs don’t even get into the specifics of game development, and CS – Computer Science – is not even about three-fourths of the development of a game, which also includes art and music, design, and business. In fact, it’s been argued that people can come out with CS degrees that don’t even know how to program! So where the hell do students get the idea that CS equals game development??

Part of it has to do with the substantial lack of good game development courses at universities. But even more of the blame should go on the students themselves, who don’t realize the amount of work involved in making a game.

I’m currently working on a iPhone game, and despite numerous attempts to establish a team, other students end up quitting after they realize game development is not fun and games, but sweat and tears. There is a precedence for this. At the game development club at my university, apparently a year before I came, the club had a team of around twenty people developing a 3D adventure game for the PC. Needless to say, the team was made up of students who, as I’ve previously mentioned, have unrealistic expectations about game development. Their project never got off the ground, and the survivors don’t like to talk about it, disillusioned about game development in general.

Is this really how it has to be? Do innocent CS students just have to experience game development the hard way?

I think the problem here is the general consensus that “video games aren’t a serious medium” somehow spills over into video game development. Say, for a second, we called it “industrial development.” Suddenly seems boring, like a real job, like it requires serious work because “industry” must be serious? Well, the truth is that “video game development” is closer to “industrial development” than most people realize. Long hours, you have to work on things you don’t want to at times you don’t want to, you have a limited amount of creative control (if any at all), and no guarantee that your product will be a success.

So if you’re a student taking CS to get into game development, start now, and start small. Ease yourself into game development making pong and breakout clones: you’ll learn more than you realize. Learn about the hardships of game development firsthand. You’ll save yourself a rude awakening later on.